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Not-for-Profit Landowning Organisations in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland

Organisational Profiles

Andy Wightman, December 1996

Contents

bulletIntroduction
bulletWhat are Not-for-Profit Organisations?
bulletWho are the Not-for-Profit Landowning Organisations?
bulletKey Characteristics
bulletLegal Status
bulletObjectives
bulletScale
bulletLandownership
bulletKey Features of Not-for-Profit Landowning Organisations in the Highlands and Islands
bulletTable 1: Legal Structure and Charitable Status
bulletTable 2: Membership Levels and Financial Turnover
bulletTable 3: Land Ownership
bulletBrief NfP Organisational Profiles
bulletAcknowledgements
bulletFurther Information
bullet

Introduction

The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of the not-for-private-profit (NfP) landowning organisations in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. The profiles have been generated from information provided by the organisations themselves in a self-completion questionnaire. A summary of their key features is given in Tables 1 to 3. A full list of organisations together with brief descriptive profiles is also provided.

These profiles cover:

bullet23 organisations
bulletconsisting of 1,249,243 members UK-wide
bulletgenerating 85,444,640 of annual turnover UK-wide
bulletowning, leasing or managing by agreement 506,864 acres (over 5 percent of land in the Highlands and Islands)

What are Not-for-Profit Organisations?

Not-for-private-profit (NfP) organisations are bodies set up to pursue both commercial and social aims for a defined constituency of people. They have been around for a long time and can trace their origins back to the Chartists, Co-operatives and Friendly Societies of the mid-19th Century. Their aim is to bring social benefit to their members either through economic activity or collective action. They range from local community associations, self-help groups and voluntary associations to large consumer and producer co-operatives, voluntary conservation organisations and mutual financial institutions. Not-for-profit organisations are defined through their legal structure and constitutions as being organisations, in which:

bulletProfits or surpluses cannot be distributed to members whether on an ongoing basis or upon winding up (except for co-operatives and mutuals where a limited distribution can be made).
bulletThe affairs are governed be a Board or Council which is elected periodically by an equal vote of the membership. The organisation is therefore accountable to a wider social grouping than is the case with a private-for-profit company or a private trust.

In addition, NfP organisations are characterised by certain values and attributes. For example:

bulletMotivation is derived from social or environmental purpose
bulletIndependence from government
bulletPersonal and voluntary participation of members
bulletMutual solidarity with other similar organisations
bulletA role in informing and educating its members and, in some cases, a wider public about issues
bulletCharitable status is common

It should be stressed that NfP organisations are not necessarily non-profit making. The critical issue is that any profits made cannot be distributed to external shareholders but are retained by the organisation (or its members in the case of co-operatives and mutuals) in order to further its objectives.

Who are the Not-for-Profit Landowning Organisations?

This paper is concerned with those NfP organisations which own, lease land, manage land by agreement, or aspire to own land in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland and who do so as a primary or major part of their activities. For the purpose of this report NfPs are taken to include those bodies which although they may not meet the strict definitions outlined above, aspire to do so through sharing many of the values and attributes of NfP organisations.

Such bodies include the Woodland Trust, Clan Donald Lands Trust and Hoy Trust whose membership has no role in the election of their Board of Council but who nevertheless share all other characteristics of NfP organisations.

The report also covers NfP bodies, which do not currently own land but aspire to do so in the future. They include:

bulletAbriachan Trust (currently negotiating the purchase of Forest Enterprise land)
bulletIsle of Eigg Trust (currently involved in attempting to purchase the Isle of Eigg)
bulletHighland Renewal (currently leasing land in south-west Mull)
bulletKnoydart Foundation (currently involved in discussions over the future ownership of Knoydart Estate)
bulletLaggan Forestry Initiative (currently negotiating involvement in Forest Enterprise land at Strathmashie)

A number of such organisations have been set up specifically to purchase or receive gifts of land in the Highlands and Islands. The Stornoway Trust was the first to succeed in a significant way, being gifted 69,000 acres in Lewes in 1923. This was followed by the setting up of the National Trust for Scotland (NTS) in 1931 who embarked on a series of purchases. Most notable were Glencoe and Kintail, which were made possible by the fundraising efforts of mountaineers including the wealthy benefactor Percy Unna. After the war there was a steady expansion of ownership by the NTS but few other NfPs were involved. The major expansion came in the late 1970s and 1980s when voluntary conservation organisations began purchasing large areas of land. In the early 1990s crofting groups extended this to purchases initially by Assynt Crofters Trust in 1993 and more recently by Melness Crofters. In the past few years' community-based groups, such as the Laggan Forestry Initiative, have emerged with aspirations to own land. Most recently, partnerships of community-based groups and conservation interests have formed such as the one currently attempting to purchase the Isle of Eigg.

The NfP sector is significant in the Highlands and Islands (defined as land north of the Highland Line and comprising around 10 million acres). Existing NfPs own, lease or manage by agreement 506,725 acres or over 5 percent of the land area (see Table 3). This is equivalent to around half the area of land owned by the Forestry Commission in the region, almost twice the area of the Scottish Office Agriculture Department Crofting Estates and over six times the land area of Scottish Natural Heritage in the region.

The land area owned, leased or managed by agreement by the NfP sector has more than doubled since 1980 from around 250.000 acres to over 500,000 acres. If the current trends continue, it might double again in a similar period.

Table Showing Comparative Areas Owned by NfP Organisations (including land leased and managed by agreement) and Public Bodies

Organisation

Acreage

Percent of H&I Land area

Scottish Natural Heritage

79,704

0.8%

SOAEFD Crofting Estates

267,891

2.7%

NfP Organisations

506,864

5.1%

Forestry Commission

1,080,200

10.8%

Key Characteristics

Not-for-Profits range from local organisations with only a few members and negligible turnover to large UK bodies with thousands of members and turnover in the millions. Some of the key characteristics of such organisations are as follows.

Legal Status

A range of legal structures is available for NfP organisations depending on their purpose. Historically, Friendly Societies and Co-operatives were the most common but in recent years more organisations have taken advantage of the flexibility of a company structure under the 1985 Companies Act.

The most common legal structure for NfP landowners in Scotland is a company limited by guarantee without a share capital. This structure allows for the full participation of members who control the company and whose personal liability is limited, usually to under 10. The absence of share capital prevents members benefiting personally from involvement in the company.

Trusts are set up through a Trust Deed, which sets out the objectives and structure of the Trust. It is unusual for a Trust to be a democratic body although this is possible as, for example, in the case of the Stornoway Trust. It is less flexible than a company but this can be of benefit where land is intended to be held in perpetuity for fixed purposes. It should be noted that the word Trust is often used in the names of organisations, which are not legally Trusts (e.g. Scottish Wildlife Trust, John Muir Trust, Assynt Crofters' Trust) but which are actually companies.

In addition to the legal structure, some NfP organisations enjoy charitable status. In Scotland this is obtained via the Inland Revenue. In England and Wales, charities are registered with the Charity Commissioners.

Of the 23 NfP bodies listed in this report:

bullet11 are companies limited by guarantee without a share capital
bullet6 are Trusts
bullet2 are companies limited by shares
bullet1 is governed by a Royal Charter and Statutes

Objectives

The objectives of NfP landowning bodies range from:

bulletReligion
bulletEconomic and social development
bulletHeritage conservation
bulletNature conservation
bulletWoodland restoration

Scale

The scale of NfP landownership varies widely. Some organisations consist of a small number of local people (to whom membership is restricted) whose sole function is to own and manage a local landholding and whose financial turnover is low. At the other end of the scale are organisations with a national (Scottish or UK) scope, owning parcels of land across the country with thousands of members and financial turnover in the millions.

NfP Organisations Range From:

Members

Annual Turnover

Geary Common Grazings

21

1,050

Borve and Annishader Township

18

1,250

To:

   
National Trust for Scotland

230,000

29,000,000

RSPB (UK-wide)

935,000

35,000,000

Broadly speaking the smaller organisations tend to have:

bulletSmaller memberships restricted to certain categories (crofting tenants for example)
bulletSmaller landholdings limited to the immediate area of interest
bulletLow turnovers reflecting limited availability of capital and economic opportunities

The larger organisations tend to have:

bulletLarger memberships with eligibility open to anyone
bulletLarger and more numerous landholdings
bulletHigher turnovers reflecting large memberships and an ability to attract public funds and income from goods and services

Land Ownership

Organisations my own a small local area for local community benefit or be national organisations with national objectives owning large areas of land across the country.

NfP Landowners Range From:

Acreage Owned

Dalnavert Community Co-operative Ltd

125 acres

Treslaig & Achaphubuil Crofters

160 acres

To:

 
RSPB

83,180 acres

National Trust for Scotland

160,000 acres

Key Features of Not-for-Profit Landowning Organisations in the Highlands and Islands

The following 3 tables summarise the legal and charitable status of organisations, their membership size and annual financial turnover and the amount of land that they own, lease, manage or aspire to own.

Table 1: Legal Structure and Charitable Status

 

NfP Organisation

Date formed

Legal Status

Charitable Status

1 Abriachan Forest Trust

1996

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Pending

2 Assynt Crofters’ Trust

1992

Company Ltd by Guarantee

No

3 Borve & Annishader Township

1993

Company Ltd by Guarantee

No

4 Church of Scotland General Trustees

1921

Trust

Yes

5 Clan Donald Lands Trust

1972

Trust

Yes

6 Culag Community Woodland Trust Ltd

1995

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Yes

7 Dalnavert Community Co-operative Ltd

1982

Company Ltd by Shares

No

8 Geary Common Grazings

1980

Common Grazings

No

9 Highland Renewal

1994

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Yes

10 Hoy Trust

1973

Trust

Yes

11 Inverroy & Bohuntin Crofters

1995

Not yet constituted

No

12 Isle of Eigg Trust

1991

Trust

Yes

13 John Muir Trust

1983

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Yes

14 Knoydart Foundation

1995

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Pending

15 Laggan Forestry Initiative   Not yet Constituted

Pending

16 Melness Crofters Estate

1994

Company Ltd by Guarantee

No

17 National Trust for Scotland

1931

Trust

Yes

18 RSFS Forest Trust Company

1995

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Yes

19 Royal Society for the Protection of Birds

1889

Royal Charter & Statutes

Yes

20 Scottish Wildlife Trust

1964

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Yes

21 Stornoway Trust

1923

Trust

Yes

22 Treslaig & Achaphubuil Crofters (Woodland) Trust Ltd

1994

Company Ltd by Shares

No

23 The Woodland Trust

1972

Company Ltd by Guarantee

Yes

Table 2: Membership Levels and Financial Turnover

 

NfP Organisation

Number of Members

Eligibility for Membership

Annual Turnover

1 Abriachan Forest Trust

7

Not yet determined  
2 Assynt Crofters’ Trust

127

Registered Crofters in 13 Townships

11,000

3 Borve & Annishader Township

18

Limited to Crofters & residents on estate

1,250

4 Church of Scotland General Trustees

34

Ministers and elders of Church of Scotland  
5 Clan Donald Lands Trust

600

Open

870,000

6 Culag Community Woodland Trust Ltd

70

Residents of Assynt or with special interest

14,000

7 Dalnavert Community Co-operative Ltd

7

Residents of Dalnavert and by invitation

25,000

8 Geary Common Grazings

21

Registered Crofters

1,050

9 Highland Renewal

63

Open  
10 Hoy Trust

10

Invitation

17,340

11 Inverroy & Bohuntin Crofters

25

Not yet determined  
12 Isle of Eigg Trust

43

Permanent residents of island  
13 John Muir Trust

5,000

Open

350,000

14 Knoydart Foundation

10

Anyone with an interest in Knoydart  
15 Laggan Forestry Initiative   Not yet determined  
16 Melness Crofters Estate

60

All Registered Crofters  
17 National Trust for Scotland

230,000

Open

29,000,000

18 RSFS Forest Trust Company

130

Members of the Royal Scottish Forestry Society

1,000,000

19 Royal Society for the Protection of Birds

935,000

Open

35,000,000

20 Scottish Wildlife Trust

15,000

Open

2,900,000

21 Stornoway Trust

10

Trustees elected by residents on Electoral Roll

25,000

22 Treslaig & Achaphubuil Crofters (Woodland) Trust Ltd

8

Limited to Crofters  
23 The Woodland Trust

63,000

Open

16,000,000

         
  Totals

1,249,243

 

85,444,640

Table 3: Land Ownership

 

NfP Organisation

Acres Owned

Acres Leased

Acres Managed

Acres Aspired

1 Abriachan Forest Trust      

2,132

2 Assynt Crofters’ Trust

21,300

     
3 Borve & Annishader Township

4,502

     
4 Church of Scotland General Trustees

15,000

     
5 Clan Donald Lands Trust

20,000

     
6 Culag Community Woodland Trust Ltd  

89

   
7 Dalnavert Community Co-operative Ltd

125

     
8 Geary Common Grazings

970

     
9 Highland Renewal  

1,544

   
10 Hoy Trust

12,500

     
11 Inverroy & Bohuntin Crofters      

2,000

12 Isle of Eigg Trust      

7,400

13 John Muir Trust

34,400

     
14 Knoydart Foundation      

17,200

15 Laggan Forestry Initiative      

3,000

16 Melness Crofters Estate

10,773

     
17 National Trust for Scotland

160,000

     
18 RSFS Forest Trust Company

3,000

     
19 Royal Society for the Protection of Birds

83,180

10,148

4,295

 
20 Scottish Wildlife Trust

23,519

167

15,292

 
21 Stornoway Trust

69,400

     
22 Treslaig & Achaphubuil Crofters (Woodland) Trust Ltd

160

     
23 The Woodland Trust

16,500

     
           
  Totals

475,329

11,948

19,587

31,732

Notes:

bulletThe column Acres Managed denotes land managed by the organisation under agreement with another landowner.
bulletThe column Acres Aspired indicates the extent of land, which the organisation aspires to eventually own, or share in the use of.

Brief NfP Organisational Profiles

This section of the report contains brief thumbnail sketches of the 23 NfP organisations that provided information via the self-completion questionnaire. Organisations are presented in alphabetical order.

Abriachan Forest Trust

Margaret Davidson, Abriachan Nurseries, Abriachan, Inverness-shire IV3 6LD Tel: 01463 861 232

Abriachan Forest Trust is a community group who are hoping to purchase a 2,132-acre Forest Enterprise wood in order to secure local amenity, promote community participation and create jobs.

Case studies provide further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm

and www.forestry.gov.uk

Assynt Crofters' Trust

John MacKenzie, Culkein, Drumbeg, by Lairg, Sutherland IV27 4NL Tel: 01571 833 258

The Assynt Crofters' Trust purchased the 21,300-acre North Assynt Estate in Sutherland in 1993. The Trust operates through a Board of Directors, which is elected by crofting tenants in the 13 townships on the estate. The Trust employs a part time Project Officer and its aims are to improve the social, educational and cultural environment of the crofting community and of the natural environment of Assynt in Sutherland. The Trust has already succeeded in creating a number of projects and has been responsible for raising the profile of crofter and community ownership of land in the crofting counties.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm

Borve and Annishader Township

Alaistar Nicolson, 5 Borve, Portree, Isle IV51 9PE Tel: 01470 532 425

The Borve and Annishader Township owns the 4,502-acre Borve and Annishader Estate on the Isle of Skye, which it bought in 1993. It as the second major community ownership success in 1993 but unlike North Assynt, where membership and full voting rights are restricted to crofting tenants, membership of Borve and Annishader Township is open to all residents on the estate. To-date the company has initiated a new woodland scheme and hopes to increase community participation and develop further land management projects.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm

Church of Scotland General Trustees

Pamela Burnside, c/o Secretary and Clerk, Church of Scotland General Trustees, 121 George Street, Edinburgh EH2 4YR Tel 0131 225 5722 Ext. 268

The Church of Scotland General Trustees was set up in 1921 and are responsible for the administration of property and funds to best advance the interests of the call of the Church of Scotland to bring the ordinances of religion to the people of Scotland through a territorial Ministry. The management of the 15,000-acre includes some 750 letting units and is carried out by Glebes Committees operating in consultation with Parish Ministers and Presbyteries. The Trustees employ 10-full time and 7-part time paid staff.

Clan Donald Lands Trust

International Director, Clan Donald Centre, Armadale, Isle of Skye IV45 8RS Tel:01471 844 305

The Clan Donald Lands Trust was set up in 1972 to purchase 20,000-acres of the former Macdonald of Sleat Estate. The Trust manages the estate, which includes a large Visitor Centre, accommodation and a licensed restaurant. Its mission statement is to make a visit to the Clan Donald Visitor Centre a special experience offering quality and educational value. To aid the conservation usage and sustainable development of the Trust's properties. To maximise profits thus enabling these aims. The Trust employs 18-full time and 18 seasonal staff and is governed by a Board of 15 Trustees. A further 600 members support the work of the Trust but do not have any role in the election of the Board.

Culag Community Woodland Trust Ltd

John Gibson, Unapool House, Kylesku, by Lairg, Sutherland IV27 4HW Tel: 01971 502 344

Culag Community Woodland Trust is a community-based charitable company, which was set up in 1995 to promote the concept of community woodlands in the local area. Its objectives are to manage Culag Wood, to develop forestry and woodland skills, to enhance the environment, and to provide recreation and woodland related employment. It leases the 89-acre wood from Assynt Estate on a 50-year lease with the option to renew.

Case studies provide further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm and www.forestry.gov.uk

Dalnavert Community Co-operative Ltd

Euan MacAlpine, Druim nam Beithe, Dalnavert, Kincraig, Kingussie, Inverness-shire PH21 1NQ Tel: 01540 651 253

Dalnavert Community Co-operative is a company (operating as a co-operative) set up in 1982 by six people in Strathspey when 150-acres of land at Dalnavert near Feshiebridge came on the market in 1982. The co-operative bought the land and the members of the co-operative each have a shareholding together with one vote per household. Members of the co-operative own their own homes on the farm but the shareholding of the co-operative cannot be transferred either to members or to outside interests and remains with the house. The economic activities of the co-operative are based upon 35 Aberdeen-Angus cattle and the production of 25 to 40,000 heathers in a nursery. One member of the co-operative is employed as a farm manager.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm

Geary Common Grazings

Norman MacKinnon, 14 Geary, Waternish, Isle of Skye IV55 8GQ Tel: 01470 592 241

The Grazings Committee purchased the 970-acre Geary Common Grazings in 1980. Common Grazings are established under crofting legislation and are registered and regulated by the Crofters Commission.

Highland Renewal

Director, Taigh Sithe, Knockvologan, Fionnphort, Isle of Mull PA66 6BN Tel: 01681 700 587

Highland Renewal is a company limited by guarantee set up in 1994 and has an open membership of 63 people. It leases 1,544-acres of land on the Ross of Mull and aims to develop knowledge and practice in the holistic regeneration of Highland rural land. A pilot project, the Tigreragan Project has been launched, which has improved access to the land, established native woodland, re-introduced the lazy-bed system and published a historical account of the area.

Case studies provide further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm and www.forestry.gov.uk   Website: www.highlandrenewal.ndo.co.uk

Hoy Trust

Dr Tony Tricket, Glebelands, Longhope, Orkney KW16 3PQ Tel: 01856 701 460

The Hoy Trust was set up in 1973 to take over the Hoy Estate, which was put in trust by the owner, Malcolm Stewart. The Trust owns the estate for the preservation, improvement, administration and management of the estate. In 1983, 9,700-acres of the estate were sold to the RSPB. The Trust is now actively developing tourism ventures and environmental work.

Inverroy and Bohuntin Crofters

John Toal, Kinturk, 17 Inverroy, Roy Bridge, Inverness-shire PH31 4AQ Tel: 01397 712 489

The Inverroy and Bohuntin Crofters Steering Group was set up in 1995 to consider the feasibility of purchasing a block of Forest Enterprise land. The proposal remains under consideration.

Isle of Eigg Trust

Maggie Fyffe, Trust Secretary, Cuagach, Isle of Eigg PH42 4L Tel: 01687 482 486

The Isle of Eigg Trust was set up in 1991 with the aim of owning and managing the island for the benefit of the residents and to promote sustainable development. Currently the Trust is engaged with the Scottish Wildlife Trust and The Highland Council in a joint purchase bid. A business plan has been prepared and a fund-raising appeal has been launched.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm   Website: www.isleofeigg.org

John Muir Trust

Nigel Hawkins, John Muir Trust, 12 Wellington Place, Edinburgh EH6 7EQ Tel: 0131 554 0114

The John Muir Trust is a membership body formed in 1983 and named after the Scots born conservationist, John Muir, who campaigned in the USA for wilderness protection. The aims of the Trust are to bring Britain's finest wild landscapes into stable long-term conservation ownership. It already owns 34,000-acres of wild land in Knoydart, Skye and Sutherland and has over 5,000 members. It places an emphasis on managing land in partnership with local communities. The Trust employs 11 staff and has a turn of 350,000.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm Website: www.jmt.org

Knoydart Foundation

Duncan MacPhee, 101 High Street, Fort William. Tel: 01397 701 000

The Knoydart Foundation was formed in 1995 with the aim of securing a sustainable future for Knoydart. Its origins lie in the confusion, which has surrounded the future of the Knoydart Estate. Members include local residents, adjoining landowners and the John Muir Trust and it hopes to be able eventually to purchase the Knoydart Estate.

A case study provides further information: www.forestry.gov.uk

Laggan Forestry Initiative

Lucy Grant, Laggan Forestry Initiative, Community Office, Laggan, Newtonmore PH20 1AH Tel: 01528 544 383

The Laggan Forestry Initiative is a sub-committee of the Laggan Community Association, which is involved in a process of negotiating greater involvement in the management of the 3,000-acre Strathmashie Forest. The Initiative has aspirations to purchase the forest but these have been put aside in favour of a partnership arrangement with Forest Enterprise. The aims of the Initiative are to improve employment opportunities for the local community, to enhance the environment, to act as a catalyst for other community projects and to help other communities similar to Laggan.

Case studies provide further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm   and www.forestry.gov.uk

Melness Crofters Estate

Mark Brennan, Dalvraid, West Strathen, Melness, Sutherland IV27 4YT Tel: 01847 601 324

The Melness Crofters Estate was set up in 1994 to take over the ownership of the 10,773-acres of land in Sutherland. Its members are the registered crofters on the estate and its aims are to manage the estate for the benefit of the community.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm

National Trust for Scotland

Regional Director (Highland), National Trust for Scotland, Abertarff House, Church Street, Inverness IV1 1EU Tel: 01463 232 034

The National Trust for Scotland is the largest national voluntary conservation organisation in Scotland employing 375-full time staff and 700 seasonal staff, with 230,000 members, an annual turnover of 29 million, and an estate of 176,827-acres including Glencoe, Kintail and Mar Lodge estates. Its purpose is to promote the permanent preservation of places of historic interest or natural beauty on behalf of the nation. It was established in 1931.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm   Website: www.nts.org.uk

RSFS Forest Trust Company

Michael Osbourne, 62 Queen Street, Edinburgh EH2 4NA Tel: 0131 225 8142

Members of the Royal Scottish Forestry Society set up the RSFS Forest Trust Company in 1995. It owns 3,000-acres of hill ground at Cashel on the east bank of Loch Lomond and has launched a project The Forest for a Thousand Years, which will re-establish native woodlands on the site. The project is part of the Millennium Forest for Scotland Initiative. Membership of the company is open to all members of the Royal Scottish Forestry Society.

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds

Peter Mayhew, RSPB North Scotland Office, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW Tel: 01463 715 000

The RSPB was established in 1889 and is the largest wildlife conservation organisation in Europe with over 950,000 members in the UK (65,000 members in Scotland). It owns 83,180-acres of land in the Highlands and Islands. The RSPB acquires land as a last resort when it believes that other conservation mechanisms will not protect the land and its conservation interest. It employs 900 staff and has an annual turnover of 35 million in the UK.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm   Website: www.rspb.org.uk

Scottish Wildlife Trust

Reserves Manager, Scottish Wildlife Trust, Cramond House, Kirk Cramond, Cramond Glebe Road, Edinburgh EH4 6NS Tel: 0131 312 7765

The Scottish Wildlife Trust was established in 1964 and is a voluntary conservation organisation concerned with the protection of all forms of wildlife and plant life in Scotland. It manages 107 nature reserves and has 15,000 members. It owns 23,159-acres of land in the Highlands and Islands, leases a further 167-acres and manages by agreement a further 15,292-acres. It employs around 100 staff and has an annual turnover of 2.9 million.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm   Website: www.swt.org.uk

Stornoway Trust

Iain MacIver, Stornoway Trust Estate Office, 20 Cromwell Street, Stornoway PA 87 2DD Tel: 01851 702 002

The Stornoway Trust owns the entire Parish of Stornoway and was constituted through Deed of Trust in Parliament in November 1923. The Trust was established to receive a grant of land and assets from Lord Leverhulme. The estate covers an area of 69,400-acres and includes 39 crofting townships covering 1,300 crofts and includes the town of Stornoway. The Trust is managed by a Board of Trustees elected by the 13,000 residents who are on the Electoral Roll of the Parish. The Trust employs 14 staff and has an annual turnover of 240,000.

Treslaig and Achaphubuil Crofters (Woodland) Trust Ltd

Michael Foxley, 2 Achaphubuil, by Fort William PN33 7AL Tel: 01397 772 775

Treslaig and Achaphubuil Crofters (Woodland) Trust is a share company set up in 1994 by the crofters from the two crofting townships on the shores of Loch Eil. It owns 160-acres of native woodland consisting of birch and oak, which it is managing in conjunction with crofting activities. The company has been involved in further bids for forest land being sold by Forest Enterprise but has to-date been unsuccessful in purchasing further woods.

A case study provides further information: www.forestry.gov.uk

The Woodland Trust

Angela Davis, Operations Director Scotland, Glenruthven Mill, Abbey Road, Auchterarder, Perthshire PH3 DP Tel: 01764 662 554

The Woodland Trust was established in 1972 and is a UK body, which aims to restore woods and all forms of wildlife in the UK and thereby to secure and enhance the enjoyment of the natural environment by the public. It owns 80 properties in Scotland covering 16,500-acres. The Trust employs over 130 staff and has an annual turnover of 16 million in the UK.

A case study provides further information: www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm   Website: www.woodland-trust.org.uk

Acknowledgements

This paper was prepared for participants at the Not-for-Profit Landownership Seminar held in Inverness on 27 November 1996. Highlands and Islands Enterprise, Scottish Natural Heritage and the European funded Highland LIFE Programme provided funding for these activities.

The author would like to thank everyone who took the time and effort to complete the questionnaires, which form the basis of these organisational profiles.

The efforts of both George Campbell in leading, organising and co-ordinating the project and Graham Boyd for additional assistance and discussions on the NfP landowning sector were appreciated and welcomed by the author.

The views expressed in this paper do not necessarily reflect the views of all the contributing organisations or the funders. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the author.

Further Information

Those wishing to obtain further information on social landownership, Scottish land ownership patterns and other land related issues will find the following publications invaluable:

bulletSocial Land Ownership: Case Studies from the Highlands and Islands - Volume 1, (eds) G. Boyd and D. Reid, NfP Landowners Project Group and Scottish Community Education Council, Edinburgh, 1999. ISBN 0-947919-45-7  www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm
bulletSocial Land Ownership: Case Studies from the Highlands and Islands - Volume 2, (eds) G. Boyd and D. Reid, NfP Landowners Project Group and Scottish Community Education Council, Edinburgh, 2000. ISBN 0-947919-21-X  www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm
bulletSocial Land Ownership: Case Studies from the Highlands and Islands - Volume 3, (eds) G. Boyd and D. Reid, NfP Landowners Project Group and Scottish Community Education Council, Edinburgh, 2001. ISBN 0-947919-45-7  www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/case.htm
bulletWhole Estate Plans - The Framework Document, NfP Landowners Project Group, Inverness, February 1999.  www.caledonia.org.uk/socialland/estate.htm
bulletThe Prince, the Merchant and the Citizen - The Need for a Strategic Approach to the Social Land Ownership Sector, G. Boyd, Caledonia Centre for Social Development, Inverness, 1999.  www.caledonia.org.uk/land/prince.htm
bulletLand Reform and the Failure of Government: Lessons from Scottish Civil Society, G. Boyd, Caledonia Centre for Social Development, Inverness, 1999.  www.caledonia.org.uk/land/failure.htm
bulletLand Reform Draft Bill Part II - Community Right-to-Buy, Caledonia Land Progamme Briefing No 3, Andy Wightman, Caledonia Centre for Social Development, March 2001.  www.caledonia.org.uk/land/brief03.htm
bulletWho Owns Scotland, Andy Wightman, Canongate Books, Edinburgh, 1996.
bulletScotland: Land and Power - The Agenda for Land Reform, Andy Wightman, Luath Press, Edinburgh, 1999. ISBN 0-946487-70-7
bulletHow Scotland is Owned, R. F. Callander, Canongate Books, Edinburgh, 1998.